Play Free Bet Blackjack

Another popular Blackjack variant is Free Bet Blackjack.  This version was created by Geoff Hall, who also invented Blackjack Switch, Zombie Blackjack and Zappit Blackjack.

The big difference from regular Blackjack is that the player doesn’t risk his own money when splitting or doubling down, for the most part.  I’m sure you thinking that’s great, show me where to sit!  Fortunately it won’t take long to understand the rules, especially if you’re already familiar with regular blackjack.

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Rules

Apparently the rules have been modified since the original launch in 2012, and casinos can develop their own rules, but the following are considered the standard.

  • Six decks
  • Dealer hits soft 17’s
  • Blackjacks pay 3 to 2
  • Double after split allowed
  • Double on two cards only
  • Re-split pairs up to four hands, including aces
  • No surrender

Three major changes from a standard game:

  1. FREE DOUBLES – with a 2 card total of 9, 10, or 11.  The player’s bet is matched with a “free bet” button and the player receive 1 additional card.
  2. If the dealer wins, the player loses only his original bet.
  3. If the player “pushes,” the player gets back only his original bet.
  4. If the player wins, the player get back his original bet, plus double the original bet.

  Regular doubling is allowed on all other two-card totals.

  • FREE SPLITS – With all pairs, except 10’s, the player’s cards are split into 2-one-card hands.  The player’s original bet is placed with the 1st hand and a “free bet” button is placed with the 2nd hand.  Each hand is played out one at a time, (where “free doubles” and “free splits” are still allowed).  For winning hands, the “free bet” button is replaced with chips equaling the original bet. Losing or push hands result in the dealer taking back the ‘free bet” button.
  • Dealer pushes with 22. If the player has 21 or less and the dealer busts with 22, the player’s bet is a push.

Basic Strategy

Strategy will depend  on whether you playing your real money hand or the “free bet” hand.  This is because with a ‘free bet,” a push is just as bad as a loss.  Therefore you want to be a bit more aggressive with a “free bet” hand.  Afterall, you’re not playing with your own money.

An easy thing to remember strategy-wise, take every free double and free split opportunity you can.  It’s free money!

Worth Playing?

Free Bet Blackjack was accepted by casinos because they know the idea of “free money” is appealing to gamblers.  The idea is that players will make larger original bets, hoping to get the opportunity of a free double or free split and thereby win bigger.

If you are a skilled player and a card counter, Free Bet Blackjack can result in some very profitable sessions.  The question is whether or not you can stay disciplined in play and make the bigger bets, only when it’s most opportune and not in hopes of hitting a big free bet.

Vegas Casino Online One of my favorite casinos to play this game because of their super blackjack bonus

Is Wonging in Blackjack Effective?

Wonging

This is a technique named after Standford Wong, the pen name for the legendary author of “Professional Blackjack” and other gambling books.   It’s not that Stanford invented the technique, but many of the users were Wong’s students.

It is when you stand beside or behind a blackjack table and count the cards and then decide to sit down at the table when the deck is favorable to you as the player.  It is also called “back-counting,” because you’re counting cards from behind the players. 

It is mostly used when there are several decks in play because it allows the wonger to spend some time counting cards.  If only a couple of decks are being used, the wonger doesn’t have a chance to get a good count on the deck before it’s shuffled.

By sitting down when the deck has become favorable, you can make relatively larger bets at once, hopefully without drawing suspicion.  If you’ve been at a table a while and suddenly start making bigger bets, the pit boss may consider that a sign that you’re counting cards and know the deck is suddenly favorable.

Some casinos try to negate wonging by having a “no mid-shoe entry” policy.  However, that can be difficult to enforce, so it still can be done effectively.

There is also a technique called Semi-wonging, where you actually leave the table at a predetermined point in the count.  For instance, you may have sat down when the count was +8, but decide to leave the table if the count falls to +4.

Wonging Advantages

The most obvious advantage is that you only play when the deck is favorable to you.  You don’t have to make minimum bets because you’re only playing when the count is highly favorable, allowing for maximum bets for you.

With bankroll management a vital concern, not having to waste time and money with minimal bets when the deck is not favorable, is a huge advantage.  The bigger you can bet, the more you can win, in a shorter period of time.

Wonging Disadvantages

Though standing around and counting cards can be relatively simple, it can also be noticed by casino surveillance. The casino will eventually realize that you observe tables for a bit and then sit down and make relatively large bets.

Despite sitting down when the deck is favorable, there’s no telling how long the deck will remain this way.  You will of course want to get up when the deck starts cooling down.  Casinos become wary of card counting when a player sits down for only a couple of hands, gets up and perhaps watches a few hands and then sits down again.  You don’t want to be that obvious.

Final Thoughts

Wonging has been around since probably the 1970s.  It can still be done effectively today if it is thoroughly understood and practiced.

In terms of doing it effectively, you need to be able to count cards from a distance, without drawing attention to yourself.

As a wonger, you probably won’t have your table mates happy with you because you sit down and start winning, while they have suffered through all the bad hands!  Just tell them you’ve brought them luck, since the deck is now favorable for all players!

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Understanding Bust-Out Rates

Dealer Bust-Out Rate

This refers to the chance a dealer has of busting out, depending on the up-card.  It’s not imperative to know the exact percentages for each up-card, but knowing the relative rate can help you decide how you will play your cards.

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It has been determined that for an overall rate, a dealer will bust 28% of the time.  The following chart will show the dealer bust rate based on each available up-card.  The first row is the up-card, the second row gives the bust-out percentage:

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Ace
35% 37% 40% 42% 42% 26% 24% 23% 23% 17%

Of course these rates (specifically for 10 up-card) refer to those times the dealer does not have blackjack.  If the dealer had blackjack, you wouldn’t even play the hand.

There is clearly a significant drop between having a six or having seven.  This is why “basic” strategy can vary depending on the strategy card you’re using.  It is also why it can make a big difference if the dealer must “hit” a soft 17 or must stand on all 17’s.  If the dealer must hit a soft 17, the bust-out rate for a 6 up-card increases to 44% and for an Ace up-card increases to 20%.

One observation that should be made with this chart, is that the dealer bust-out rate is never over 50%, not even close. So, the dealer never has an up-card that will bust more often than not.  That’s part of the built-in house advantage of the game.

Player Bust-Out Rate

Knowing the player’s bust-out rate is as important as knowing the dealer’s bust-out rate.  The idea is that you don’t want to take the chance of busting out, if the dealer has a better chance of busting out.  In other words, you want to stand pat with your hand only if you have a greater chance of busting than the dealer. The top row is the hand value, the 2nd row is the bust-out rate.

121314151617181920
31%39%56%58%62%69%77%85%92%

As you compare the two charts, you should be able to understand the basis of strategy charts a little more.  First, you want to remember that these rates are primarily used when learning to deal with hand values of 12-16, because you should know not to hit hand values of 17-21.

So, you want to stand when you have 13-16 and the dealer has up-cards of 3-6, because you have a higher bust-out rate (39%-69%) than the dealer (37%-42%) Also you can see that it should be fairly safe to hit a twelve because your bust-out rate is lower than the dealer’s rate in those cases. 

You will find there are experts who say knowing these bust-out rates will help your play, while others profess that such knowledge is useless.  As I first looked at it, it was a bit confusing, but as I took the time to understand it, I think it gave me a better understanding of basic strategy as outlined on strategy cards.

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Card Counting Practice

As with anything you want to be proficient at, it requires practice.  Card counting is no exception.  While it is definitely not illegal, casinos don’t like it to be used because it absolutely allows the player to win more and lose less.

To use it effectively, you have to make sure your usage is not detectable!  Card counters have to be cool, calm and collected, so the pit bosses don’t start keying on your activities.  You want to practice until the process becomes second nature to you.

How To Practice

Fortunately, it’s as simple as grabbing a deck of cards and counting through the entire deck, one card at a time.  Using the simple Hi-Lo method, as you count through the 52 cards (jokers removed), your final count should be 0. 

Your goal should be to get faster each time through.  The expert card counters are able to get through a deck in less than 30 seconds.

Speed Counting

The difference between professional card counters and beginners, is the expert’s ability to count cards in groups, as opposed to counting each card individually. 

Because cards are generally grouped in pairs as you look at a blackjack table, it should be your goal to look at a pair and immediately know that value.  For instance, if you see a Jack and a 3, you should automatically think “0” instead of “-1” and “+1”, = “0.”  Learn to recognize low cards (2’s-6’s) and 10-value cards cancel each other to 0.  In the same vein, with 2 low cards, immediately think “+2,” and with 2 10-value cards, think “-2.”  Being able to look at 2 cards at once and have a count, will dramatically increase your counting speed.

Distractions

You want to practice your card counting with as many distractions as you can possibly create, because casinos will have many distractions.  Just the noise alone in a casino can make card counting difficult. 

The casino atmosphere can work a little in your favor as well, because if you can maintain your cool and keep a running count of the cards on the table, without a pit boss becoming suspicious, more power to you!  You want to be focused, but not “look” focused on the cards dropping on the table. 

You want to be able to take only a second to look at cards and a get a count in your head.  If you can only count by intently staring and doing the math in your head, you will be caught by a pit boss and kindly asked to leave the table.  Learn to count with just a peek at the cards and do the math in your head while looking away from the table.

Online Practice

Finally, there are many online simulators that will help you increase your card counting speed and accuracy.  These are effective ways to truly test how fast you are at counting.  You may have gotten very good at challenging yourself with hand dealing to yourself, but rest assured, it’s more difficult with the online simulators and therefore great practice.

I like cardcountingtrainer.com and the free counter at casino.org just to name a couple of trainers.  All you need to do is a google search for card counting simulators to find one that you’ll like. 

Many people don’t try card counting because they feel it’s too difficult.  That’s not true!  All it takes is practice, practice, practice. 

It takes a lot of practice because the hardest part of card counting for blackjack, is doing it calmly enough so that you’re not caught doing it.  Remember, it’s not illegal, so you won’t get arrested, you’ll just be asked to not come back.

The best way to stay calm about it is to know it so well, that it’s like second nature to you and you can count without batting an eye.  That just takes practice!

European Blackjack, Rules & Strategy

With Europe being the place where Blackjack was said to be born, the European version does vary slightly from the classic American standard and therefore more and more players look to challenge themselves with the European version.  It is mostly played online and in some rare instances, can be found in land-based casinos.  Rules can vary slightly depending on the casino you play at, so always be sure to look at their complete set of rules before sitting down at the table.

Oddly enough, you can find the European version played with anywhere from 2-8 decks of cards, so verify how many decks are being used at the casino you choose to play at.  Playing with 6 decks is most common.

Standard rules with any version:

  • – No Peek – dealer doesn’t look at hole-card, player loses total bet on dealer blackjack
  • – Dealer must draw to 16
  • – Insurance is allowed
  • – Cards are shuffled after each round

 

Rules that can vary depending on the version:

  • – Splitting allowed only once and only with identical cards (cannot split King/Queen, for instance)
  • – No splitting of 4s, 5s, or 10-valued cards
  • – If Aces split, player can only receive 1 additional card on each ace
  • – Blackjack pays 3:2
  • – Dealer always stands or always hits a soft 17
  • – Player can double on any two cards
  • – Double after split may or may not be allowed
  • – Surrender may or may not be allowed, though not if dealer is showing an Ace

As you can see, there can be several differences involved depending on where you play the game.  Make sure you understand all the rules to the version you opt to play, so you can strategize accordingly.

European Blackjack Strategy

The fact that the cards are shuffled after every round, makes it difficult to count cards, so don’t expect to practice your card counting skills playing European blackjack!

The first notable variant is that splitting of 4’s, 5’s and 10’s is not allowed.  This can vary depending on the casino you’re playing at.  While classic strategy tells you not to split those pairs anyway, the rule was set to make sure it’s not done.  By splitting, you’re giving yourself the opportunity to increase your bet and win more, something the casino doesn’t want to happen.

The variant considered most significant is that the dealer is not allowed to take a look at his face down card until all players decide what they want to do.  In most versions, the dealer is dealt only one card first anyway. Remember, with classic blackjack, the dealer will check for a blackjack if he has an Ace showing.

That changes strategy slightly because if the dealer eventually has blackjack, a player may have double downed or split cards, losing the additional bets.  With classic blackjack, the dealer immediately checks for a blackjack, “saving” the player from making additional bets on a “losing hand”.

Compared to classic American blackjack, in European blackjack, your play should be more conservative.  You’ll be doubling down and splitting less often.  For instance, when the dealer has a ten or an Ace, you don’t want to be doubling down so quickly, because he still may have 21 and you would lose even if you do make 21 yourself.

Conclusion

This is a great choice if you want to try a different version not too far off the classic blackjack. The differences are minor and easily figured out, so it makes it an easy game to fight the boredom of classic blackjack.

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Quick & Easy Soft Hand Strategy

Probably the most misplayed hands in blackjack are the soft hands.  The casual player gets easily baffled about when to hit or double.

A good rule to follow with soft hands is to “Always count your Ace as an 11 first.”  You do that until your total is over 21, then make it a 1 and play your hand like it is a hard hand.

 

Doubling Down with soft hands:

As a start, you always want to double down when the dealer is showing a 5 or 6, if you have a soft 13-18. The idea behind this is to maximize the return on your bet.  When you double down, you believe you are more likely to win the hand than lose the hand.  With a 5 or 6 showing, the dealer is going to have to take a hit, with a greater probability of busting and you winning.  You want to take advantage of that by making a bigger bet through doubling down.

The strategy charts will tell you the only other times to double with a soft hand is when the dealer shows a 3 or 4.  When the dealer shows a 3, you double with a 17 or 18, when the dealer shows a 4, you double with a 15-18.  Other than those instances, you’re going to just hit or stand.

The strategy behind doubling down also entails that the play must also return a greater profit than playing that hand in any other manner!  So, with many soft hands against a weak dealer’s up-card, you make money over time regardless of whether you hit or double.  But with certain cards, just hitting makes more money because it gives you the ability to take a second hit if your first hit is low.  Doubling down with the wrong soft total can make you go from favorite to underdog, so playing the cards right is essential.

Rule of 9

This is the final easy way to learn the correct times to double down with soft hands.  First, you definitely have to have A/2 – A/7 (13-18) before thinking about doubling.  What you then do is add your kicker card (the non-Ace) to the dealer’s up-card and if the total count is nine or greater, you double down on your bet. If the sum total is less than nine, you just want to hit your hand.

The Rule of 9 is only correct 94% of the time though because of the situation of A/4 against a dealer’s 4.  The rule says you should just hit that (sum total is 8), but mathematically you’re actually about a half percent better off if you double down on that. It’s a borderline call, and based on thousands of hands played, “in the long run” doubling down in that situation pays off more often than not. It’s an exception to the rule.  If you can remember this exception, playing the Rule of 9 will have you doubling down on soft hands, with precision. 

Final Thoughts

Learning to play correct soft doubling can add .10% advantage to basic strategy.  That may not seem like much, but over time, that can make a big difference in your profit/loss.  There are 3 easy rules to follow when deciding on soft doubling. They are: Always soft double against a 5 or 6, Never soft double against a 2 and if the dealer has a 3 or 4, go with the Rule of 9. 

Casual players make the mistake of doubling down against any dealer small up-card.  Don’t slip up like that!

There is “correct strategy” for when to double down with a soft hand…learn it!  Trust the charts!

 

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Blackjack Split Strategy

Knowing when to split cards and actually doing it at the game table, can be two different things for many blackjack players.

It’s well known good strategy that you always split Aces and Eights.  Even the most casual player can understand that and be quite comfortable with remembering and doing that when faced with that choice. 

Splitting the F’s

Another blackjack lore (there are many) is that you “never split anything that starts with an F.”  In this instance, F stands for 4’s, 5’s and faces.

As your playing strategy and knowledge advances beyond basic strategy, you come to realize that adage is not always right.  The only part that is always right is that 5’s should never be split.  Any “hard” ten combination should be played the same way.  So, if you have 2/8, 3/7, 4/6, or 5/5, play them the same.

You would think it would be bad to split faces, and that is so for a basic strategy player.  However, in some cases, when you’re counting cards, it can be advantageous to split faces.  Staying with never splitting faces, is the best strategy for most players though.

The difficult question with 4/4 is whether to double down, hit or split the pair. For the most part, splitting 4’s is a no-no, but against dealer’s 5up or 6up, you want to split.  The error many players make with a 4/4 hand, is that they will double down on this if the dealer is showing less than 6.  Again, if you think of 4/4 as a “hard” eight, like 5/3, or 6/2, you know not to double down.

Re-Splitting

It becomes a difficult choice for the amateur player when they make the correct decision to split a pair and end up with another pair to split.  What you must keep in mind is that the situation hasn’t changed, so if it was correct to split the pair the first time, it’s correct to split again.  As long as the table rules allow, you want to continue to split as long as you’re pairing up.  If it’s the correct play the first time, it will be the correct play the 2nd, 3rd or however many split chances you get in the one hand. Yes, it can become expensive, but it you win the bets, it can be a very profitable hand, especially if the dealer busts!  As long as you have the chips to bet, keep splitting if it’s the right play!

Doubling Down

It’s common for amateur players to “forget” to double down after splitting cards.  If you split and face a double down situation, you have to remember to make that double down.  The amateur probably worries about having many bets in play on a single hand, but you have to make the double down when it is there for the taking.  When you have the double down play, it’s clearly your advantage at that time, don’t save your extra bet for the next hand that might not be a winner for you.  Always jump at those times when you know you actually have the advantage, don’t be afraid.

Multi-Card Hit

While it’s not considered splitting cards, the decision to hit a multi-card 16 or multi-card soft 18 is also a difficult choice to make for the average blackjack player.

With a multi-card hard 16, you still must hit if the dealer has a 7 or better.  The number of cards you need to get to 17 or better should not be your concern.

With a multi-card soft 18, you must remember that it’s a “soft” 18, so the correct play is to hit if the dealer has 9 or better.  It’s not the number of cards, it’s the point value of the cards that count!

In Summary

Understanding splitting and multi-card strategy is what will take your game to that next level.  By not doing the above outlined strategies, and not trusting what basic strategy tells you to do, you will give back 1/3% of the advantage to the casino.  You can’t be afraid to re-split a pair,  double after a split or hit multi-card 16’s or soft 18’s.  Even if you do everything else right, you’re giving away advantage over the long run.  Trust the process!

Understanding Frequently Misplayed Hands

 

While most regular players know basic strategy, it’s been shown that several common hands are often misplayed under the stress of an actual game.  To make sure your game is at that higher level, you’ve got to avoid the pitfall of making the wrong play because of “a gut feeling.”

The most common misplayed hands are:

  • 12 vs. 3 up
  • 16 vs. 7 up
  • 11 vs. 10 up
  • A/3 vs. 3 up
  • A/7 vs. 3 up
  • A/7 vs. 9up
  • 9,9 vs. 9 up
  • 8,8 vs. 10 up
  • Blackjack vs. A up

As you look at this list, it should be hard to imagine that 8,8 is misplayed because every regular player knows Aces and 8’s should always be split.  However, perhaps because a player might have a big bet up, or have already lost the last few hands, they don’t want to lose “2” more bets, so they won’t split. 

Or with the Blackjack bet, they feel they would rather get “some” money, (take even money) as opposed to “pushing” (receiving no money) with a dealer’s blackjack.

You need to have complete faith in the basic strategy and that it will work out in the long run.  You must remember that basic strategy is based on mathematical logic.  Make sure you take the correct path based on basic strategy. The numbers do speak for themselves. 

 

Blackjack vs. A up – Correct play is NOT to take even money

Taking even money is identical to taking an insurance bet.  If you opt for even money you’re asking the dealer to payout your blackjack at 1:1, vs 3:2.  This way, if the dealer does have a blackjack, you will get paid some money instead of “pushing” with the dealer and winning no money that hand.

Unfortunately I’ve seen it time and again, a player wants any kind of money if they’ve lost the last few hands, and wants to take the sure win.

With the insurance bet usually being ½ the original bet and paying 2:1, you would at least make “even” money should the dealer have a 21.  If you don’t take the insurance bet and the dealer has 21, you “push” and don’t win anything with your 21.  If you take the insurance and the dealer doesn’t have blackjack, you lose that insurance bet (half the original bet,)    but are still paid 3:2 on the blackjack.  However, you’re only winning even money because that extra half bet you win with the blackjack, was used for your losing insurance bet. 

That is why players will take the insurance, in order to seem like they at least win something.  It’s hard to watch your blackjack push when you think you should automatically be winning the hand!  You have to have the mindset that a push is at better than a loss, because you don’t lose any money.  Don’t be afraid to match a dealer’s 21 and push!

 

You must realize that, on average, the dealer will have blackjack with you only four out of thirteen times.  So, more often than not, you will win your 3:2 bet, as opposed to taking even money or insuring.  The other four times you will tie, not lose any money at all.  Insurance is a sucker bet for the most part, which is why casino’s offer it! 

A/7 vs. 9up – Correct play is to hit

Here is one time that assuming the dealer’s down card is a ten should help you make the correct play.  If you think the dealer has 19, you know an 18 won’t win, so go ahead and take the hit.  There is no way you can bust with one more card.  It’s been figured out that you will win nine out of twenty times if you hit to a hard 17, soft 19, or better.  If you stand with the soft 18, you’ll win eight out of twenty times.  So, do you give yourself eight chances or nine chances to win, the choice is yours!

 

 

 

 A/7 vs. 3up – Correct play is to double

Many players feel that the soft 18 is strong here because the dealer stands a great chance of busting.  It’s been calculated that standing with this hand wins 58% of the time, however, doubling down on this hand wins 55% of the time.  So for only a 3% drop in your chance of winning, making double on a single hand is worth the risk. 

 

 

 

A/3 vs. 3up – Correct play is to hit

What makes the difference here to just a regular hit is that basically Ace/”small” vs. dealer’s “small” is considered a bad double.  If you hit this hand, the advantage is still slightly on your side, however, if you double, the odds drop to 50/50, making it a bad choice.  There are plenty of soft hands that are good for doubling, but this isn’t one!

 

 

11 vs. 10up – Correct play is to double

This hand is often misplayed by merely hitting, because players fear the assumed 10-count hole card.  Once again, through proven stats, you’ll hit a 20 or 21 more often than the dealer will have 20.  Remember, it’s  more likely than not, that the dealer’s hole card is less than 10. It’s been figured out that you win six out of eleven times if you double down on this hand.

 

16 vs. 7up – Correct play is to hit

Here again, if you assume that the dealer’s hole card is a 10, you have to hit for any chance at winning. Players will stand with 16 because of the fear of busting.  They fear the bust and all of a sudden want to hope that the dealer has anything but a 10-count.  Of course that’s totally backwards logic.

With a 7up, the dealer will bust only 3% more often than with a 10up. (26% vs. 23%)  The player’s chance to bust remains the same with either dealer up card.  If you think about the fact that you have many more cards that won’t bust you, as opposed to the number of cards that will bust you, it should make you more comfortable to take the hit.

12 vs. 3up – Correct play is to hit

This hand is probably the most misplayed hand in blackjack.  Once again, beginner player’s assume the 10 hole card and feel, “better to let the dealer bust than me!”  But if you think about the fact that there are only 4 cards that will bust you, and 5 cards that give you at least 17, making the correct choice of hitting should be easier.

The dealer’s 3 against your 12, is not as weak as you might initially think.  If the dealer has a 10-count in the hole, only a 9 or 10 will bust him.   With a 4, 5 or 6, the dealer’s chance of busting is increased significantly, so standing with a 12 is correct.

The dealer will make a hand five out of eight times, with a 3up.  Your chance of hitting to a 17 or better against a 3, is a little bit better than standing.  

Final Thoughts

The professional blackjack player won’t misplay the above hands.  They are often misplayed by the regular player, who knows the right move, but misplays under a pressure situation.  It’s hard to have the discipline to play the correct strategy if the cards are not particularly running in your favor.  However, that is exactly the time to make sure you are playing correctly.  Don’t let the pressure of the situation have you making a bonehead play. Trust that the basic strategy, based on mathematical analysis, will give you the right pieces to complete that profit puzzle!

Blackjack Attack, 3rd Edition Review

This is the 3rd and last edition for author Don Schlesinger, of his Blackjack Attack books. It is his largest and probably best reference book, with well over 500 pages and more than 400 tables and charts.

The book includes a compilation of 13 years of articles that were published through Arnold Snyder’s Blackjack Forum.  The Blackjack Forum has been and still is a great resource for any level blackjack player. It also includes brand-new material that has never been published.

Being the third edition, it is targeted at the more advanced blackjack player.  If you’re a beginner or less experienced player, you might feel much of it is over your head.  Though it reviews the basics, it is for the player who understands basic concepts and is looking to get their game to that next level of  profitable blackjack on a consistent basis.

He has gotten contributions from some of the sharpest minds in blackjack research. Working together with these other experts, they explain how they’ve broken new ground in many different ways.  Through their research, they feel they have “The World’s Greatest Blackjack Simulation”  system.  It gives you the complete set of 8-deck charts, optimal betting ramps, risk-of-ruin equations, and how to test the formulas’ accuracy, providing the reader great new research.

What you will find new in this edition are chapters 9, 12, and 13.  Respectively, the enhanced SCORE (Standardized Comparison of Risk and Expectation), article, explaining the differences of various blackjack games and card counting systems, is new for chapter 9.  Chapter 12 takes you on a walk down the Vegas Strip, and Chapter 13 shows the research on shoe-departure points, as well as risk-averse strategies.  And there are new appendices with new and revised tables, strategy expectation tables, how rules variations can effect play, and much, much more.

As a final note, this “Ultimate Weapon” third edition of Blackjack Attack provides essentially all the tools that an advanced blackjack player should have in their arsenal of knowledge, to exact a full-out mugging on the casinos.

Click here to perfect your game!

What is the House Edge

The house edge can be described as the built in advantage the casino has in games, in order for the casino to make money. It is the casino’s average profit on a player’s bet. It is well known that blackjack has the lowest house edge in all casino games, which explains the popularity of the game.

If you’ve ever wondered why blackjack has the best odds for the player, it’s because the casino has just one advantage in blackjack, which is the fact that the player makes the first move in the game.

Think about it, if the player decides to take a hit and busts, the house wins right away, without making a move. Even if the dealer busts later in the deal, that player that already busted, still loses.

Ok, say you try the strategy of never busting yourself. With that, the dealer will make 17 or better more often than you, so you still lose in the long run. When the first player to bust automatically loses, the player who has to act first, is at a distinct disadvantage. That distinct disadvantage has been calculated to be 8% for the player.

Yes, that is a ridiculous advantage for the house, so that’s why the developers of the game decided on rules that would bring down that percentage, making it a more enticing game to play.

PLAYER-FAVORED RULES

  • Blackjack paying 3-to-2 vs. even money
  • Hit/Stand at will vs. dealer hitting on 16 and standing on 17
  • May double down vs. dealer no doubling
  • May split pairs vs. dealer no splitting

As you look at the above rules, it does show that basically all the rules favor the player, except for the fact that the player must act first. The dealer also has to follow strict rules that must be played exactly the same, every time, so the dealer plays like a robot.

Maybe that’s why some dealers seem a bit grouchy! You sometimes hear players saying certain dealers are tougher than others, when actually every dealer plays by the exact same rules! In reality, no dealer is tougher than another. Therefore, the house edge over a player is ultimately decided by how well the player uses the favorable rules of the game!

PLAYER OPTIONS TO CUT HOUSE EDGE

  • 3-to-2 blackjack payout cuts house edge by 2.25%
  • Correct hitting/standing strategy cuts house edge by 3.25%
  • Correct doubling down strategy cuts house edge by 1.5%
  • Correct pair splitting cuts house edge by .5%

That totals a 7.5% player advantage if perfect strategy is used by the player, leaving the .5% house edge for casinos.

The casino doesn’t have to beat every player every time. Even the tiniest margin, as in blackjack, is enough to make it a viable game for the casino to offer players. All the casino has to do is make it a game that you will play and the casino will win in the long run.  That’s how and why the house edge works.

It can be said that there is some skill involved with blackjack. If you learn basic blackjack strategy, you can practically erase the house edge and actually enjoy profitable gambling when playing blackjack! However, as I have stated before, it is a game of chance and winning cannot be guaranteed, considering the house edge, but the chance at winning with blackjack is much better than any other casino game.